Interested in Working with us? Join us at ‘Working at the Innovation Hub’!

Are you curious about what we do at the Innovation Hub? Are you thinking of applying to any of our roles for the Fall Winter 2021-22 Work Study term, or know of someone who might want to apply?

A blue graphic with a variety of colour icons on it. The graphic reads "Working at the Innovation Hub".

On August 11th from 1-2pm EST (via Zoom), join us at ‘Working at the Innovation Hub’, a virtual event where we share what we do and why. Learn more about Design Thinking, our projects, and insights from our team! We will also share the variety of opportunities available for the Fall Winter Work Study Term, and what elements are important to consider in the application process.

Community Event: Crushing Impostor Phenomenon in Graduate School

We would like to share this wonderful community event with our graduate student communities at UofT! ‘Crushing Impostor Phenomenon in Science’ is an initiative aimed towards minimizing patterns of Imposter Phenomenon, through a set of seminars and workshops for graduate students in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto. If you are interested, or know of individuals who would be interested in joining this community, continue reading!


Do you experience feelings of isolation and imposter phenomenon in graduate school? If you’re unsure, you can take this test to find out: http://impostortest.nickol.as/. Most graduate students do, but not many talk about it. 

We are inviting you to join the conversation by – “Crushing Imposter Phenomenon in Science”!

Commuting and COVID-19: Moving Into The Future

Written by Carla Alexander, Content Writer Icons illustrated by Vlada Gorchkova, Digital Storyteller University of Toronto is considered by many to be a “commuter university” — a school where many individuals commute, as opposed to living on campus. According to Student Move TO,…

Revisiting the Domains of Innovation

An image of Carla, with short reddish-brown hair, wearing a light blue coat

Written by Carla Alexander, Content Writer

So much has changed within the past year — not only within the world, or the university, but within the Innovation Hub as well. As the Innovation Hub progressed throughout the pandemic, our projects have highlighted new and continuing issues students navigate, such as flourishing in online classrooms or maintaining connectiveness online. With this context in mind it’s important to begin thinking about the tools that guide, frame, and inspire our work, including the most important one of all: the Domains of Innovation.  

Cyberbullying and Mental Health: CAMH is looking for participants!

The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health | CAMH
CAMH Logo- 2021

At the Innovation Hub, we see and experience how incredibly important student mental health is in our communities. In this community repost, we would like to highlight an important study by one of our community partners, the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH), and how you or a peer could participate in an important study this summer!


Mental Health Research Opportunity – Detection and Intervention of Cyberbullying on Social Media

Are you a social media user? Do you have thoughts and concerns about cyberbullying? Are you looking to get involved?

We are doing a study to better understand the needs and preferences of youth (ages 16-21) around cyberbullying on social media platforms. Our team is looking to engage with youth who are interested in collaborating with researchers to generate insights that will aid in the development of a digital tool to help prevent cyberbullying.

Community Repost: Reviewing Your Families’ Academic Year – Will it be Back to Virtual School for Yourself and Your Kids?

This week’s post is a community repost from our Redefining Traditional Team! If you are a student parent or are a student parent supporter we invite you to take a look at many other fantastic works we post on the…

All about the TIL Operations Working Group

Georgia is outside, smiling towards the camera and wearing. a dark blue shirt.

Written by Georgia Maxwell – Senior Research Assistant for Transforming the Instructional Landscape

Transforming the Instructional Landscape (TIL) is an ongoing project at the University of Toronto that examines how learning environments can be improved for both instructors and students. TIL employs design thinking to help build better learning environments with students rather than for students. A wide range of professionals from across UofT are also involved in the project’s exciting and innovative work. 

What We Learned from the ‘Let’s Talk About Failure’ Project

Amal smiling to the camera, wearing a black and light pink outfit.
Rosemarie smiling at the camera against a light green background.
Sanskriti is smiling towards the camera, they are outside with trees and scenery in the background

Written by Sanskriti Maheshwari, Rosemarie Shephard, and Amal Yusuf, Data Analysis Researchers for the Let’s Talk About Failure project

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The Innovation Hub partnered with the Division of Student Life Academic Resilience Initiative to learn about UofT students’ experiences with failure: how they define failure, how they endure it, and the impact it has on their lives. We explored existing data on the topic in our archive of over 600 interviews and reached out to students at UofT to take part in our dialogue-based feedback sessions. We approached this project with the intention of hearing from and listening to students’ stories surrounding failure in their own words and on their own terms.  

Delving into the Digital Campus: Learning – and Growing – in Community

By Kethmi Egodage, Design Researcher  

A photo of Kethmi, with a dark blue background. She's looking to the camera with long dark and red hair.

This blog post is the final post in the Delving into the Digital Campus series in collaboration with the Digital Community & Connectedness Project. It’s aimed at understanding how students find and make connections in digital spaces. Each post is a written reflection from our Design Researchers, sharing how the insights from their project has resonated with them in their own lived experiences. This post will discuss how the shift to online learning has impacted students, instructors, staff, and our design researcher’s own experiences at UofT.  


An illustration of a laptop

Zoom School. That’s a buzzword students have been using to describe the transition to online learning. With a mix of synchronous and asynchronous classes and assignments, it’s no surprise that professors and students are overwhelmed and confused. Despite the best efforts made to continue providing a high standard of education, the question still remains: how do students feel about their community in the shift from in-person to online classes?  

#DisplayYourPride 2021: Centering Resistance, Joy, and Creativity

Each year the Innovation Hub joins all three U of T campuses to celebrate Pride Month and #UofTPride with the annual #DisplayYourPride event. This year, our Senior Project Assistant – Kaitlyn Corlett (she/her/hers) is reflecting on what Pride means to…