Finding A Little Balance

If you could only tell one story about yourself, what would you tell? Is your story long, or short? Deep, or lighthearted? How would you break the ice?

I’d start with an introduction: My name is Zach and I’m in my third year at U of T, in the undergraduate Public Policy and Governance program. I also minor in Aboriginal Studies and Russian Language, just to keep things interesting. I’m from Calgary and more used to mountains and meadows than I am to towers and transit. Some of my ancestors were Cree and Russian. These roots guide my story.

Pathways through the trees.

Sometimes you find yourself in need of a guide, and that’s actually a good thing (photo taken by Zachary Biech)

But I’d go beyond the basics. I’d include other parts of my life, to paint a better picture. In short, my story needs balance. Actually, my story is about balance.

I’ll start back in grade school. I think I’ve always had some mental balance. I always found time to work hard for my marks. Don’t get the wrong idea, I had time to goof around too. In class. In front of teachers. Oops.

Before grade twelve, I lacked physical balance. I’d get home from school and eat a whole pizza sub or two for a snack. I wasn’t a shining example of athleticism. But after recognizing this imbalance, it was easy to change my ways. Ok, not that easy. My calves burn just thinking about the exercise regimes. Finding the willpower to eat healthy was even harder. Thankfully, I dropped over eighty pounds. It’s great although I miss binging on chips and milkshakes.

Next, I landed in Toronto. Imagine you’re an alien visiting another alien world even crazier than where you’re from. Now you know how I, a small-town Albertan, felt in big, bustling Toronto.  After wobbling around in this immense place like a goofball for a year, I read the writing on the wall. I needed emotional balance. Over the second year, I dealt with every emotion known to man (and maybe some unknown ones as well) and came out on top. My goofball score dropped dramatically too. I think.

A view out over the Bow River Valley in the foothills of southern Alberta

My old view from my home in Alberta (photo taken by Zachary Biech)

Toronto's impressive skyline on a bright clear day, from 18 floors up in a tower

My new view from my Toronto apartment (photo taken by Zachary Biech)

Afterwards, I still lacked something. Maybe you’ve felt the same way like you need to complete your soul’s inner circle. Profound, right? I simply realized I needed spiritual balance. So I worked up some courage, embraced my heritage, and dove headfirst into Toronto’s Indigenous communities including U of T’s First Nations House. Engaging was easy and I received the warmest of welcomes.

The vines and trees just outside the First Nations House building

Just outside First Nations House (photo taken by Zachary Biech)

Mental, physical, emotional, and spiritual balance were vital for embracing my Indigeneity and finding my personal, academic, social, and spiritual center at U of T. I even enjoy my other interests more fully, like music and cooking. If I could only tell one story, I’d talk about balance to show my perspective. But luckily, I have much more to tell! I also like listening and I think we can have a great time storytelling together.

How balanced are you?

If you could only tell one story about yourself, what would you tell?

Looking straight upwards at the big blue sky, through foliage and campus buildings

Finding centre at U of T is not as hard as you’d think; you just need to know where to look (photo taken by Zachary Biech)

 

Denying Distraction: Turning Off Your Cellphone for Class

I am the first person to admit that I have a problem. More accurately, an addiction.

My name is Rachael and I am addicted to my cell phone. 

Not in the unhealthy “I’m going to cry if my cell phone dies in public” kind of addicted, but more along the lines of “I check instagram every 15 minutes and update my snapchat story too much to be normal.”

3 "selfie" style photos of female student sitting in a lecture hall

So you’re saying it’s not okay to take multiple selfies on Snapchat during lecture…?

So this year when I made my New School Year Resolutions, I decided to attempt something crazy. Something entirely out of my comfort zone. This year I am going to turn off my cell phone during every class and tutorial. 

I think that we’re all guilty of checking our phones during class. Especially in large lectures where it’s so easy to hide our phone behind the computer screen. It becomes a safety blanket, something we can turn to when we’re feeling bored or lonely. However once you start checking your phone it can be hard to stop, and before you know it the professor is onto an entirely new subject and you have no idea what you’ve missed.

So for this upcoming school year I’ve decided to put away my phone.

The first lecture was easy. My professor was funny and engaging, and being my first class of the year it was easy for me to pay attention. I wasn’t once tempted to check my phone. This was the same for my second class, and even for my third.

It wasn’t until my 4th day of school, in the first lecture that was more in-depth than just an introduction, that I felt the pull to check my phone. I didn’t have anything specific I wanted to do – maybe just check if I have a text message or see if there’s anything new on Instagram. But I persevered and kept my wandering attention focused on the lecture.

Computer programs like iProcrastinate can help reduce distraction on your computer if your cell phone isn't the problem! (Click here to see more about this program)

Computer programs like iProcrastinate can help reduce distraction on your computer if your cell phone isn’t the problem! (Click here to see more about this program)

So while my professor continued on about the importance of Socrates in Ancient Philosophy, I came to a profound realization. I wasn’t checking my phone because I was bored or uninterested in my class. I was checking my phone because I was scared of what I was missing when I was in class. To be stereotypical, I was experiencing FOMO. (Fear of Missing Out)

I wanted to check my phone in class because I didn’t want to feel disconnected from the rest of the world, and equally so I didn’t want others to think I was disconnected.

It was then that I made a second realization; I am a student. My life, and the lives of most of my friends, is spent in class. We should be disconnected from the rest of the world while we’re there.

On top of which, it's not like your teacher doesn't notice you're distracted

On top of which, it’s not like your teacher doesn’t notice you’re distracted

I’ve had a few more classes since then, and I’m proud to say that my phone has remained turned off in the bottom of my bag. Not only do I find myself much more engaged in the lecture, but it’s made me realize how disrespectful it is to my professors and instructors. They’re giving their full attention and time to the lecture, so I should be too.

But what do you think U of T? Do you check your phone during lecture, and if you do, do you think that it’s okay? I want to hear your opinion, so leave it for me in the comments below! Until next week check out everything I’m doing (when I’m not in class) on twitter at @Rachael_UofT.

Stacks on Stacks (of books)

In the immortal words of Arthur:

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Truer words have never been spoken. Source: http://curiosityquills.tumblr.com/post/65866469434

As U of T students, we get a handy little TCard, which gives you access to numerous services on campus but also, as many of you may know, the TCard also serves as a… LIBRARY CARD!

It opens the opportunity to explore the thousands of books in the 44 libraries on campus!

The U of T libraries offer so many facilities and services both online and in person that it’s a student’s dream! But this post is dedicated to one of my favourite things to explore on campus: The stacks!

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What a beautiful sight

For those of you who don’t know, the stacks are basically the main area where the books are held. My first time navigating the stacks was a little overwhelming, but it’s not as complicated as that long call number on the books may indicate!

For example, I recently really wanted to read the English version of the Mahabharata (an ancient Indian epic) but I couldn’t find a copy anywhere. On a whim, I decided to try our own library. Spoiler alert: they had it!!

It didn’t take much effort either! In a few easy steps, I had my book.

1) Search for the title you want, or keywords. I used the website catalogue, but you can often find them using the catalogue in the libraries. You’ll see what the libraries have on the results page. Each book result has the library it’s located in, the call number of the book and also whether the book is checked out or not. Being the nerd I am, I did a tiny bit of background research to see which version I wanted.

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2) Note down the information you need to find the book: the call number and the library it’s located in.

3) Find out where in the library the book is located. For example, if the call number started with PR, it would be on the 13th floor of Robarts Library. This information can be accessed online or will be on display in the libraries (Fun fact: The inside of the elevators at Robarts have one of these signs).

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*Just for Robart’s

4) Use the last few numbers to exactly find your book of choice! 

See, U of T? Easy peasy! So next time you want a reference textbook for that assignment on viruses, a copy of that $200 textbook for that course you have to take or just a modern translation of an ancient epic, don’t hesitate to try out the stacks!

Just don’t let the power get to your head.

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With great power comes great responsibility. Source: http://elwoodcitythings.tumblr.com/post/15568208227

x

#Foodie – The Off-Campus Food Scene

To be completely honest, I don’t even know what the exact definition of a foodie is, although you’ll often find me claiming to be one. Urban dictionary had way too many varying explanations, so that didn’t help much either. I do know that the real star is the food. Which is why I recently wrote a post about making your own food, or trying some of the great food that U of T has to offer. What I like to keep in mind though, is that I’m here for about 4 years. I don’t plan on making couscous every day when some of the best places to eat are just off campus.

Being in the heart of downtown Toronto, I always like to try out what our amazing city has to offer! It’s all a part of the student experience, right?  I’ve spent many a study session abandoning my books and going for walks around the outskirts of our campus, and I’ve found some really great places. Here are a few of my favorite eateries so far!

Millie Creperie near Spadina and College – This one was a fairly recent find. A friend and I decided to walk around the area and we found this place tucked away in Kensington. The crepes are served in this little cone, which doesn’t make it any easier to eat, but makes it cuter to look at!

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Must-try: Mango Tango Crepe

Banh Mi Boys near Queen and Spadina – I found Banh Mi Boys during my Toronto staycation and although it’s probably the furthest spot from U of T, it’s definitely worth the walk! I never realized my love for Vietnamese food until I came across this place!

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Must-try: I’ve said it before; I’ll say it again. Kim-chi fries!

Fresh near Bloor and Spadina – If you’re vegan or vegetarian, you have to try this place out! They have amazing smoothies and a fairly large menu with vegan/vegetarian versions of your favorite foods! Must-try: Sweet Potato fries! They were good enough that I didn’t even have time to take a picture :(

Dlish Cupcakes near Yonge and Bloor – Dlish does amazing cupcakes. There are so many flavours to choose from, and it’s conveniently close by to campus in Yorkville. #classy.

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Must-Try: …cupcakes?

Sakura Sushi near Bloor and Spadina – Even if you aren’t a fan of sushi, this place has plenty to offer in terms of udon, grilled meats, desserts and more. Also, did I mention it was all you can eat? *Cheers*

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Must-try: It’s all you can eat. Try Everything

So that was my foodie adventure (so far). So tell me U of T, what are your favourite off-campus places to eat? 

My School-Year Resolutions

Back in January, in the midst of all the New Year’s hype, I made the same general resolutions I always do: Eat healthier. Exercise more. Try harder at school. I’m not ashamed to say that I usually break them within a month, and continue on with my junk-food-laden, physically inactive, sleeps-through-lecture life.

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Add a box of Oreos and this is literally me. Source: www.ssandmann.tumblr.com

Well my friends, I sleep easy because my real resolutions start at the point in the year when I feel that my life is starting its next level: the school year!

It’s a ritual I’ve practiced since I was a little kid: Every year, I give myself the first day of school pep talk and think about my school year resolutions. What are my goals? What do I want to accomplish? What do I need to improve on?

After my rollercoaster ride of a first year here at U of T, I resolved to 1) Get more involved and 2) Attend ALL my lectures and tutorials. Sweet and simple. The result was an incredible second year, with better grades, more confidence and a happier Api (if that’s even possible).

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Happier than this?????

After much contemplation, here are my school year resolutions for third year:

1) Get help as soon as I need it. I have gotten a little better at this over the last 2 years. I attended the occasional office hour, I tried to ask questions at tutorials and I even got some guidance from the Academic Success Centre. But, I realize that running to the professor or TA one week before the final about a topic from the first lecture is probably not the best choice.

2) Relax more!  I’ve had issues with anxiety and stress in the past, so I’ve decided that I want to do something fun or relaxing to let loose every so often during the school year. I want activities that will cause me zero stress, like yoga classes at the Athletic Centre, or even one of the creative classes at Hart House!

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Unfortunately there are no rocks for me to relax and wistfully gaze off over the water on in the middle of the city.

3) Watch fewer TV shows.  Okay, this one sounds like one of those generic New Year’s resolutions, but hear me out. I am not a casual TV watcher. I am a fangirling, fictional-character-loving, Netflix-binge-watching TV show enthusiast. I have spent an embarrassing number of hours catching up on the week’s shows at Robarts (yes, even during exam season) and I think it’s time I put a stop to it. So please, if you ever catch me trying to stifle my laughter while staring at my laptop in a quiet study area, remind of this post and my public declaration to stop.

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My reaction when people tell me to stop watching TV. Source: www.cokelame.tumblr.com

So tell me U of T, what are your goals or resolutions for the year? Let me know down in the comments, or tweet me @Api_UofT!

Navigating the Maze of Extracurriculars

I spent much of my first year in a daze of lectures, coffee and homework, so I wasn’t as involved as I would have liked. But eventually, I was able to participate in some clubs and now I’m even a member of Juxtaposition Global Health Magazine’s executive team! Looking back, I realize that it’s not always easy for everyone to find those one or two clubs that they are passionate about. So, I decided to map out my path so far to help navigate the maze of student organizations on our beautiful campus!

Try out everything. Seriously. – I bounced around a few clubs and I went to a few events before I came across Juxta. I searched through Ulife and the UTSU clubs directory to find things that suited my interests! I also got on a few mailing lists by signing up for every club in sight at the UTSU Annual Clubs fair. They also have free stuff, and if that isn’t reason enough to come, then I don’t know what is.

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Clubs fair AKA where Api likes to get free stuff (and crazily sign up for everything) – www.orientation.utsu.ca

 

Think about what YOU like – There are so many clubs at U of T you’re bound to find something you like. And once you find it, think about what you want to do with them. I have a lot of experience in planning events and it’s something I have a lot of fun doing, so I applied for the events co-director position with Juxta. That way I could do something I was good at and had experience in, while still being immersed in the global health community at U of T.

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Seriously though, do you understand why I love ulife? LOOK AT ALL THOSE CATEGORIES – www.ulife.utoronto.ca

Social media is your friend! – I found out about Juxta through a Facebook page of another group, and I found out about their executive team positions through their Twitter account. Social media is a great way to get a better idea of the club in question if they don’t have any upcoming events.

Get ready for some work! – This one is pretty obvious, but let me explain. If you take on any sort of leadership role, in entails a fair amount of work. The catch is that when you love what you’re doing it doesn’t feel like work. The last few months with Juxta, combined with my summer job and summer courses have felt overwhelming at times, but nothing is more rewarding than seeing the results of your hard work.

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Ulife asks the hard hitting questions.

You don’t need me to preach about joining clubs and getting involved because it’s an idea we encounter a lot as university students. It’s not the easiest thing to do when there are so many different opportunities, but I can assure you, navigating the clubs at U of T is worth it when you start to meet like-minded individuals, get invaluable experience and build a sense of community!

If you want to know more about Juxtaposition, then fear not, I will likely be tweeting about it nonstop!

Let me know down in the comments about how you found your favorite clubs or what clubs you want to join!

Choosing Your Courses for the First Time! 

It was only a year ago that I was an incoming freshmen, so when I say I “remember feeling anxious and nervous about choosing my courses” I actually mean it. It was literally only twelve months ago. I remember the uneasiness of not knowing which courses to take, the anxiety of waiting to find out your start time, and that feeling of disappointment when you don’t get into a class you really wanted to take.

But I’m here to tell you I survived, and you will too! I ensure you that it’s not as daunting as it seems, but you’re also not crazy for being anxious about it. I hear rumours that even the mystical fourth years (who often seen to us like they have this whole University thing down pat) get nervous and anxious too.

I survived course selection and even made it to my first day of class. (where I was clearly more concerned with getting the perfect instagram picture, I couldn't even remember how scary course selection had been!)

I survived course selection and even made it to my first day of class. (where I was clearly too concerned with getting the perfect instagram picture, I couldn’t even remember how scary course selection had been!)

So while this post won’t secure your a coveted early morning time slot, or help you choose between Intro to Mythology and Introduction to Physical Geography, here’s what I learned from going through course selection for the first time.

#1: Do Your Research! 

Course selection is different for every faculty, and even every program, so depending on what you’re studying plan to make one of the following websites your new best friend;

I learned the hard way that there’s nothing worse than spending the entire night before course selection trying to navigate through subjects and choose your courses! Get familiar with the calendar and write down the course codes of any and all the courses that interest you. You can go back and narrow down this list later, but it helps to feel comfortable navigating the abyss that is the U of T course calendar.

#2: Make a draft schedule! And then another… And then another… 

You can never have too many schedule options! Using tools like Griddy, or even just an excel document on your computer, make your perfect schedule. Now repeat this same process, but using almost entirely different courses. Now repeat this again. And again.

Griddy is an awesome tool that helps you plan our your schedule! Check it out by clicking this picture

Griddy is an awesome tool that helps you plan our your schedule! Check it out by clicking on this picture

I tried to have about four different variations of what my schedule and courses could look like. And while they got less and less appealing (the last schedule I made consisted of courses I would only take if I had to) I ended up with something in between my first and last choice.

#3: Check your times and set an alarm! 

Arts & Science students can use this webpage to find when their start time will appear on ROSI (ROSI will add another menu option on the left hand side of the page that says “view start time”).

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Once you have your start time, make sure to set a couple of alarms in case you need to get up early – or stop what you’re doing in the middle of the day. I know a lot of people also book off their course selection day from work. This may be a good option if you don’t have a flexible work environment with access to a computer and internet

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#4: Do the Prep Work! 

While it might seem a little crazy, last year I set up a work station. I laid out my essentials; a computer, a print-out of my potential schedules (a calendar version and a list of the course codes), and a list of some other courses that I could use as fillers and back-ups.

Then I made sure my computer is fully charged, my wifi connection was strong, and I began to brave course selection.

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I think I just really like organized work stations…

This is how I survived first year course selection, and it’s how I plan to survive again this year. Hopefully I was able to de-bunk some of the course selection myths, and give you a couple tips and resources to make the whole process go easier. If you still have questions, don’t forget that there are hundreds of resources out there designed to help you through this! You can always call or email your registrartalk to your program sponsor, or even check out tools like FastAnswers (for A&S students) where you can type in questions or choose from the most frequently asked!

How do you prepare for course selection? Is there anything I’m missing that I should add to my regime this year? Maybe some extensive finger stretching and strengthening in preparation? Or an ergonomic keyboard that allows me to type my course code 0.01 seconds faster? Leave them in the comments below or share them with me on twitter at @Rachael_UofT

An Ode to the Work-Study Program

As the summer unwinds, we get closer and closer to that time of year! No, I’m not talking about course selection, or frosh week or even Ribfest (although I should be, I mean have you tried those ribs?!). As the end of the summer draws closer, it means it’s time for…WORK-STUDY POSTINGS! Do you want to have a cool, fun job, where you can pretend to ‘adult’ (whatever that means), while still getting the most out of university? Then fear not my friends, for you have come to the right place!

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Nothing quite says ‘adult’ like taking selfies at your desk during work

A quick background on the work-study program: The work-study program is offered to help students develop their professional skills through various jobs on campus. The jobs run for the majority of the term (either summer or fall/winter). To be eligible, you need to be taking a minimum of a 40% course load. The best part is that you only have to work a maximum of 12 hours per week, so you have plenty of time to study, participate in student groups, or pursue other things you love!

In my first two years here, I didn’t think I would really benefit from a work-study position, since I already had a part time job. I finally decided to apply during my summer school term. and trust me, it was no easy task, but definitely worth it. The first day the positions opened on the Career Learning Network (CLN), there were over 500 postings. Thankfully, the CLN has some pretty nifty filters that you can use to find jobs that suit you. Cover letters and tailored resumes tend to feel like the bane of my existence, so I ended up using some of the online resources from the CLN and U of T’s career centre website. Tucked away in Koffler Student Services Centre is the Career Centre, where you can even get one-on-one help with a career educator!

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Actual early version of my cover letter.

After polishing up my resume and cover letter, and applying to about 12 different positions, I landed a few interviews. Finally, I got an amazing research assistant position at the the Institute for Health Policy, Management and Evalution (AKA my dream job as an undergraduate in health studies).

This is why I love the work-study program so much, and I regret not applying to it earlier. You get the same experience without the time commitment of a full-time job. Although some people take to balancing school, work and life really well, for me, it’s not the easiest thing to accomplish. The work-study allows you to have more time. I used my time this summer for another job, summer courses and some relaxing!

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#TBT to that time I relaxed a little too much

So mark your calendars, U of T! Postings go up on Monday, July 28th. Don’t miss out! If you have and questions or concerns about how to apply or how it works, let me know in the comments, or on Twitter at @Api_UofT!

A U of T Student’s Recipe for Success

I’d like to consider myself a borderline foodie, and as a result, I refuse to let the quality of my meals slip just because of a few trivial things like ‘exams’ or ‘homework.’ I have a few go-to methods and recipes to make sure that even when heading to Robarts at 8AM for a 12 hour study session during midterms, I’ll still be able to have a healthy and preferably home-cooked meal to eat. Apparently cake pops and Frappucinos are not part of a balanced meal.

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When it looks this good, anything can be a part of a balanced meal.

I’ve come to the realization that the problems with being healthy while busy (for me at least) can be narrowed down to a few issues:

  1. Money
  2. Flavor
  3. Time

Sometimes, it may just be easier to grab a cheesy poutine from the food truck, but I still try to make myself decent food despite these issues. After many failed attempts with expensive veggies, bland food and simply just sleeping in too late to cook anything, I’ve finally figured out a system that works for me. So here is one of my favourite recipes, along with some of my useful shortcuts to go along with it!

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Couscous Salad!

Let me take a minute to express my outright love for couscous. All you have to do is add boiling water, and it cooks in 5 minutes. Even if a 5-minute cooking time isn’t short enough, this is the perfect food to make in big batches on a Sunday night, for a daily grab-and-go during the week. It’s also super customizable. So if kale or celery isn’t your thing, you can add whatever vegetables you love (or whatever vegetables are cheapest to buy!). I have a flyer app on my phone called Reebee that gets me all the grocery store flyers, so I scan it to stock up on fruits, veggies, and anything else I might need thats on sale.

Recipe: Amounts can vary depending on how much you want to make but here are the general ingredients! Enjoy!

-1 cup of cooked couscous
-1/2 cup of chopped kale
-1/2 cup of scraped carrots
-1/2 cup of scraped zucchini
-1 tomatoe, diced into small pieces
-1 small onion diced into small pieces
-1 tsp chopped ginger
-salt and pepper to taste
-lemon juice
-2-3 tbsp of olive oil

Instructions: Sauté ginger, carrots and zucchini and kale in a large pan. When cooked to your desire, add salt and pepper to taste and set aside to cool. Meanwhile, mix together the tomatoes and onions with a little lemon juice, olive oil and salt. Once everything has cooled down, mix together in a large bowl and store in the fridge! This will save cooking time in the morning so you can be more relaxed. Or, you can always sleep in longer and rush out the door, but either way, you have a meal ready to go!

To make it extra special (this is where the flavor comes in), invest in some flavourful ingredients such as sriracha sauce, balsamic vinegar, sesame oil or fresh coriander (or other herbs). Most of these don’t go bad very easily and last in the pantry or fridge for a long time. It’s comforting to know that the $4 I spent on sriracha was well worth it.

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Just kidding, I never regret the sriracha.

Sometimes, even despite our best efforts, life can get too hectic to even make time for cooking (see: Finals week). If you ever need to find somewhere to eat on campus, there’s a app for iPhone and Android with the UeaT Campus Food Map! You’ll have all of the campus restaurants and cafés at your fingertips!

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Makes it easier to find Harvest Noon <3

So tell me U of T, what are your go-to healthy recipes? Let me know down below in the comments or tweet me your suggestions at @Api_UofT on Twitter!

Library Lovin’

Last week I had my very first (and maybe last?) summer school exam and I found myself once again spending a lot of time in the library. I’ve never been one for studying much in Robarts (although the 12th floor views are a big pull for getting there earlier and snagging a table in the window section of the St. George corner) so over the last 2 years I’ve sought out smaller, more visually appealing libraries. If you read my last post you’ve already gotten to see some of my favourite (outdoor) study spaces so this one will be some of my favourite indoor spaces!

Hart House • 7:00 am – Midnight • noise level varies hh

Hart House Library is a great space because it's so central on campus. Unfortunately every other student at U of T also thinks it's a great space so all the good spots are pften taken. Never fear though, you can normally find a spot onthe benches and chairs on the landing, or at a table in the reading room.

Hart House Library is a great space because it’s so central on campus. Unfortunately every other student at U of T also thinks it’s a great space so all the good spots are often taken. Never fear though, you can normally find a spot on the benches and chairs on the landing, or at a table in the reading room.

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Chairs and benches on the landing

This is on the landing at the east end of Hart House and I've never actiually studied here because it's always occupied but one day I will.

This is on the landing at the east end of Hart House. I’ve never actiually studied here because it’s always occupied but one day, if I’m lucky, I will.

Knox College Library • hours vary • quiet space

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The perfectly inspiring place, especially when poring over history books. Look up and be transported to a bygone age of architecture. Make sure you check out the old card catalogues!

Emmanuel College Library (Victoria College) • hours vary • quiet space

This tiny library is so beautiful and only gets really full at the peak of exam season. To get here go to the third floor of Emmanuel College, in front of you will be the reading room (which I also love) and to your right is the library. There are divided desks throughout the main floor and some (but don’t quote me on this) up on the mezzanine.  DSCF2541DSCF2537DSCF2535

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The reading room opposite the stairs. People seem to sleep in here a lot.