Learning How to Own My Interview

Picture of a laptop and pen and notepad
Picture via Pixabay.

What’s your one-minute success story?

This was the first question we had to ponder at the Career Centre’s Own Your Interview workshop, and I had no idea what to say. In my defense, it was 10 am, and I was incredibly sleep deprived. It was certainly a wake up call that I was NOT prepared to own my interview any time soon.

Planning for Uncertainty

A picture of different ice cream flavours: strawberry, mango, bubble gum, cotton candy
I didn’t plan to have ice cream today. But sometimes uncertainty can be a good thing.

When I signed up for the Career Centre’s Planning Your Career workshop, I was ready to plan. And planning I did. I plotted out my career goals for the next three years with the help of a nifty linear diagram. My plan even had a pretty good end goal: landing my dream job after university.

This was all fine and dandy (I’ve been making colourful five year plans for the past ten years), until I remembered an underlying theme of the Planning Your Career workshop: it’s almost impossible to see the end goal of your career, since a lot of jobs are found through chance. In other words, plans are a good way to explore your career options and help develop your goals, but they don’t factor in all the unpredictable elements that go along with actually landing a job.

Navigating My Skills with Navigating the Workplace

A picture of steps leading to a door

When I signed up for Navigating the Workplace, a workshop offered by the Career Centre, I didn’t know what to expect. This was the first Career Centre event I had ever attended, and the event description only vaguely spoke about building goals, understanding workplace expectations, and learning effective communication skills. However, at the end of the event, I gained insight into how to effectively communicate my qualities, and about the different ways to approach career exploration.

Why I’m Setting Career Goals This Year

An arrangement of shrubs and flowers partially cover front campus and University College
Front campus, in all its glory

It was my first day of classes at the University of Toronto, and I stepped onto the trampled turf of front campus with a pair of juvenile—and, admittedly, cliché—Converse and a backpack-sized collection of goals for the incoming year. I was brimming with a plethora of productive emotions, such as anxiousness, homesickness, and—probably the most helpful one—fear.

Luckily, I made it out first year alive, and with zero regrets. Zero regrets, that is, except for one.