September 26th, 2014

Favourite Study Spots

We’re all spending hours of our lives swallowed up in the depths of the library anyway, may as well do it somewhere beautiful!

At U of T we have endless study space, which really is a luxury.  We have 44 libraries across 3 campuses, and even more student lounge and mixed-use areas.  Before we start to resent the flickering florescent lights and crowded desks in Robarts, why not explore some other study spots and appreciate some of the beautiful spaces on campus?

Here are some of my favourites:

 GradRoom  

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Gradroom, at 66 Harbord St. is a great mixed use space.  It’s not necessarily a quiet study space, but there’s plenty of areas for reading, or meetings and group work. There’s also a second cup inside and a great outdoor patio- hit it up while it’s still nice enough to sit outside!  During the week, Gradroom is open from 7am to 8pm.

At Gradroom, you can also book the lower level for free as a grad student.  The space can be arranged to accommodate various programming such as lectures, presentations, or group activities.

Reading Room in Gerstein Library

image borrowed from heritage.utoronto.ca

image borrowed from heritage.utoronto.ca

When entering Gerstein library, it may not seem  like much but take a sharp right and enter the reading room through the double doors and you’ll enter into a space where you’ll think “I will FINISH my paper today- and then take on the world with my brilliance!” And even if you spend an hour skimming facebook, that’s okay, because you’re in such a gorgeous and studious place where at least someone probably completed something important.

Keep walking to the back room and you’ll find more rooms with lots of natural light, old books, and large portraits of old white guys that probably did something important too.  And if you make your way upstairs you’ll find group study rooms that you can book here. If you find yourself freaking out or on the brink of a group work-induced meltdown- it’s okay- look out the windows at that beautiful ivy.

Graham Library, Trinity College

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At 6 Hoskin Avenue, this library has a beautiful quad and tranquil fountain.  It  makes for a great study break area, or spot to eat lunch with some friends in between classes. But what’s my favourite part of this library? One each floor there is a small living room-style area with big comfortable arm chairs and a FIREPLACE. That’s right.  So go on, feel classy.

Heart House Library

 

image borrowed from Life@UofT Blog

image borrowed from Life@UofT Blog

Hart House library, which can be found on the second floor of Hart House is a cozy spot to curl up with a book and nap, I mean study. Check out the photo above taken in 1930- looks about the same today!

These are just a handful of great spots on campus, what are your favourite study spots?

 

September 22nd, 2014

That Darn Inferiority Complex

Hi there,

My name is Laura and I am a second year graduate student in the Masters of Public Policy Program.   This year I’ll be the new gradlife blogger and I’m excited to to start a new year with you at U of T- welcome to new students and welcome back to returning students!

In my first year the biggest personal hurdle I had to get over fast if I was to succeed was most definitely an inferiority complex.  I was so pleased to have gotten into my program but immediately following my excitement other things started dominating my thoughts such as:

“How did I even get in?”

“Will I be able to keep up in class?”

“What if it’s just too hard for me?”

billy madison 1

These thoughts were most likely brought on because I was faced with a lot of change and assumed the worst out of fear of something new. However, everything came up Milhouse once I connected with my peers and learned that many of us shared the very same insecurities.  Once I become comfortable with my peers and my new classes I realized I got into my program for a reason: because I spent years preparing for this in my undergraduate classes and my professional & voluntary experiences.  I deserved to hold a spot in my program, and I could most certainly engage and participate with the material in class and with my professors and classmates.

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I’m sharing this story with you right off the bat because I know that some of you probably have similar insecurities at this time in the semester-especially if you’re brand spankin’ new! My advice is to remember this: no one knows what they’re doing.

Keep Calm_No One Else Knows What They Are Doing Either

Okay, maybe that’s an over-generalization, and maybe some of your peers are pure geniuses, but the truth is this: no one is an expert in their field yet- or they wouldn’t be in grad school! We’re all here to learn new things and hopefully in a supportive and collaborative environment where your opinion matters just as much as they next guy or gal.  Go get ‘em and good luck in your first couple weeks of classes!

and remember kids,

you-is-kind

 

September 4th, 2014

New Beginnings

 

Guest Post by Sheri Stock

It’s that back-to-school time of the year when the excitement of new friends and shiny school supplies coincides with the apprehension of new professors, new classes and for many, a new campus to navigate. My name is Sheri and I’m a second year grad student in the Master of Social Work program. I remember feeling excited but also nervous at the beginning of fall semester last year. The first thing I did was set aside time to explore the campus to avoid that deer-in-the-headlights feeling. Once I got a sense of the major buildings and campus layout, I felt more like a bona fide grad student and less like an awkward tourist. If you didn’t participate in a campus tour then I’d recommend checking out the following places:

 

via: http://tinyurl.com/q8s6ka8

Reading through key websites was also helpful to find the information that I’d need throughout the school year such as the following:

After collecting a stack of hefty syllabi in the first week of classes, I felt overwhelmed yet again. Resist the urge to bury your syllabi somewhere deep in your desk drawer and instead, read them carefully.  These documents contain all the information you need for your coursework and will prevent you from asking a question that has already been addressed.

Good luck!

 

 

 

April 22nd, 2014

Summer Stuff

My brother is coming to visit in a few weeks, and I’ve been planning his trip for the past week. The great thing about Toronto is that there is a lot to do, so much that we can’t possibly fit everything I want to take him to in a week. As we wrap up GradLife blogging for this semester, I thought it would be nice to end off with a list of things you can do this summer. It’s my second full summer in Toronto, so I’m excited to try all these things too!

1. Visit the Aquarium

Ripley’s Aquarium is a new attraction right next to the CN Tower. I haven’t visited yet, but a few of my friends have, and they loved it. If you’re a photographer, it’s a perfect place to take some dramatic shots with the water in the background. Everyone I know who’s been there says it’s a must-go.

2. Shop at St. Lawrence Market (and visit the Distillery District while you’re there) 

I think everyone has heard of St. Lawrence Market, but how many have actually been there? The market is a chef’s dream. The produce is unbelievably fresh – if you love to cook, you have to buy your ingredients here at least once. If cooking isn’t your thing, maybe brewing is. The Distillery District is close by. I hear you can visit the breweries and try some of their sample brews!

3. Take Pottery Classes

If you missed out the pottery class Grad Escape a few weeks ago, here’s your second chance. The Gardiner Museum holds drop-in classes every Wednesday, Friday and Sunday. It’s only $12 for students!

4. Visit a Cute Coffee Shop or Cafe

There’s something about Toronto and coffee shops that go together. You can’t have experienced all the difference neighborhoods until you visit their signature coffee shop or cafe. Some of my favourites around campus are Bicerin (latte pictured below) in Baldwin Village and Sicilian Sidewalk Cafe in Little Italy.

5. Visit Museums for Free

Our TCard is magic. We can get discounts are certain businesses, which is great. It can get us free admission to others, which is even better. Every Tuesday, admission to the Royal Ontario Museum is free for post-secondary students. All you need to do is show them your TCard. Nifty, right? The Art Gallery of Ontario also has free admission Wednesday nights starting at 6pm.

 6. Watch a Show or Performance 

There are plenty of opportunities to watch live shows and performances around town. In fact, there is a Grad Escape for a Mirvish production next week that I will be going to! There are still tickets available for that one. If you missed out on the many Grad Escapes this year, or want to see more, check out The Second City (Comedy/Improv), the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, the National Ballet, Mirvish Productions and Lower Ossington Theatre. Some these places have student discounts too!

I’m not a Toronto native, so I’m bound to be missing something. What is your favourite summer thing to do in the city? Share in the comments below.

It’s been a great year. Congratulations to those of you finishing up your degree. Have a great summer!

April 10th, 2014

Resolutions v2.0

I am writing this with a great sense of joy. This week is my last week of classes, meaning that as soon as I hand in my final paper this Friday, I will have finished my first year as a masters student.

I’m not sure about you, but now that things are wrapping up and summer is approaching, I think it’s time to revisit my old new years resolutions. I’m just going to say out right that I did a horrible job at meeting any of my resolutions this year. So, as our school year comes to an end, I wanted to try this resolution thing again. Version 2.0, if you will.

In today’s post, I will be visiting two places on campus that can help us get a fresh start. Let’s go!

1. The Athletic Centre’s Personal Training and Nutrition Counseling

Two years ago, I injured my knee and required some physical therapy. While I was getting treatment at our campus’ sports medicine clinic, my therapist recommended that I do more exercises to help build up my knee strength. That was when I started doing personal training with the trainers at the Atheletic Centre. I know that personal training and nutrition counseling sounds really intimidating. Fortunately, they ask you what kind of trainer you want, and I got one who was really nice, not at all like that drill sergeant you’re imagining. You don’t have to commit to getting trained for a length of time – once you get your assessment done and your trainer set outs a plan for you, you can take what you’ve learned and keep going by yourself!

2. Hart House‘s many classes

Now that classes are wrapping, it’s time to learn something new. I recently started doing photography and am planning on taking some photography classes this summer. There are also a million other classes (okay, maybe not that much), from film-making, to theatre, to dance. I’ve also done some drop-in fitness classes over the summer, doing things like Nia (which is a bit like Zumba).

Now that everything is wrapping up, what resolutions do you want to re-tackle? Share in the comments below!

April 4th, 2014

School’s (almost) Out For Summer!

This is a second installment of the family related post I wrote last week. Enjoy!

Last week’s family care blog really got me thinking about family, and the things I used to do a a kid. I wasn’t very adventurous. I liked reading, writing (some things never change), and was apparently a very lazy chatterbox. I also watched a lot of Sailor Moon, and it apparently influenced me so much that I feel compelled to rewatch the whole series during crunch time just to relive my childhood. Go figure.

I also went to summer camp. I absolutely loved summer camp. There were a few different ones I’ve been to over the years, from the municipal community programs, to ones that my taekwondo studios offered, to SUNIA in the Rockies. I remember summer camps being the few places where I met and played with new friends. As much as I loved going to school and seeing my friends, even little me appreciated a change of pace ones in a while.

If you’re a student parent or guardian and you’re looking for things your kids can do over the summer, check out the different summer programs that are available all over the city. I didn’t grow up in Toronto, but a quick search told me that the City of Toronto has many summer camp programs, from recreational programs, to more arts and culture based programs. U of T also has our own summer camps for children of students and faculty. I may not be that old, but back in my day, there was not nearly so much variety.

So this week, I decided to take myself back to good old days. If I were to choose any camp to go to this summer, I would go to…

1. Fencing Camp

When I was little, I watched this show where all these people fenced to win this big competition. It wasn’t a really good show, but I thought the people fencing looked cool. Since then, I have always wanted to it. Who knows? Maybe a young, phys-ed hating me would have loved fencing.

2. Adventure Camp

U of T’s Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Edcuation offers the Mini and Mighty Adventure Camps, designed for kids ages 4-5 and 6-7, respectively. It sounds fun, and I think it’s great to instill kids with a sense of adventure early on.

3. Dance + Movement

I took ballet when I was 5, enjoyed it, but quit after this one fall during a performance. I still regret quitting. To be completely honest, if I were young enough I would sign myself up for this camp right now.

Of course, it goes without saying to sign up for this camps as soon as possible. Spaces fill up quick!

Did you go to summer camp when you were little? What was the wackiest thing you have ever done in camp?

minicrystalballet

March 26th, 2014

Grad School and Family

Before I start, I want to say that I don’t know the first thing about taking care of a family. I’ve never been in a position where I am the caregiver of my loved ones, be it children or older parents and relatives. But when I do see friends and colleagues in those positions, I always wonder how they are able to balance school, work and family. I can only imagine the incredible burden on their shoulders.

In honour of those friends, I have decided to do a post on family and the resources available to help student caregivers. As my program director likes to say, there is always support available on campus. The first person you should go to for guidance, especially when it comes to managing your academic work, is your advisor or program director. They can provide advice and help you manage your work load while you sort things out.

Today’s post is going to be separated into the different kinds of support you can get from our very own Family Care Office. The service is home to many programs and workshops that are designed to help student parents and caregivers take care of their families. For example, their Life Management workshop series is geared towards helping students find balance between their academic and family lives. This series includes workshops on career planning, and some even count towards the GPS program.

Services for Student Parents and their family

Some grad students may have a young family or are expecting a new baby. If my mom’s stories are to be believed, taking care of kids is hard. According to her, my brother and I were a handful, though I distinctly remember us being absolute angels. The Family Care Office has a number of workshops and groups for student parents to help them prepare for life as a parent, from learning how to make baby food, to parenting teens (this one gave me a giggle) to a single parent support group. Grad students who are expecting a little one can also book an appointment to talk about taking a leave, funding and EI eligibility.

There are also child care services available for students on campus. The office has an online list of babysitters (who are all U of T students or partners/spouses of U of T Students), and a listing of day cares and after-school programs, many of them on or close to campus. They can also provide information on Summer camps and occasionally offer seasonal events, such as their recent March Break Activities for parents and children, which included an origami workshop and sky gazing.

Taking care of aging family members

Taking care of family isn’t just about young families and kids. Many students are also responsible for taking care of elders, especially since grad students are generally older, and have older parents. Learning to manage caregiver responsibilities is something that I am also starting to think about as my grandparents and parents get older. FCO regularly offers workshops on elder care, like these upcoming workshops on Healthy Caregiving and Understanding Canada’s Retirement Income System

In addition to workshops, they can also provide information on home care services, long-term care facilities for aging family members, friendly visits, and other services you may need to help you take care of your family. During my last year of undergrad, I was a friendly visitor at a seniors home. Elder care has a special place in my heart. Taking care of seniors takes a completely different kind of patience compared to taking care of children, so I am especially happy to know that the Family Care Office is helping students transition into being a caregiver for the seniors in their family.

How many readers are student parents or caregivers? What tips or advice would you give your fellow students? I would love to hear your tips and advice below.

March 21st, 2014

3 topics/theses I would go to research events just to see

As grad students, I hope that we are proud as what we do. We are in the cutting edge of research and knowledge, emerging leaders of our field. I’ll stop sounding like my program director now, but you get the point. At some point in our time here, we would be showcasing our work, educating others about the things we do. And there’s no better time to do it than now.

There are a lot of research-related events happening right now. As far as I know, many graduate divisions have their own version of research day. For some, it’s the highlight of their academic year. My own home division’s research day is on May 7, and everyone in IHPME is excited, even those of us in the professional programs. I might even present something myself! If your division doesn’t have a research day, or if you’re looking for other events to share your work, there are also school and nation wide competitions you can enter. In fact, the Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) is happening right now!

I don’t think I need to go into why you should enter a research day competition. We all know and can probably recite them in our sleep. Instead, I’m going to take the spectator’s side. Why should those of us who don’t have a thesis ready be attending these events, other than to support our friends and colleagues, maybe network a bit more? It’s got to be interesting. It’s got to be mind-blowing. If there were 3 topics/these (probably non-existent papers) that would make me feel the absolutely need to attend a research day event, they would be…

1. The impact of YouTube videos on eating habits

Hear me out on this one. There have been studies (don’t quote me) about poor eating habits and TV dinners. Now that things like YouTube and smart TVs are becoming more popular, how is that going to impact the length of time we spend eating, and what we are eating? I’ve heard people say that things like ads and full hour episodes can be bad for health, since you’re primed to eat junk food or to spend more time munching. What happens when you’re marathoning the Food Wishes YouTube channel?

2. A New Brand of Canadian Celebrities: Justin Beiber and Rob Ford on the World Stage

The world is fascinated with our two most infamous celebrities. Why? No, seriously. Why? How?

Follow-up study: Parallels of the rise of Beiber and Ford and their (perhaps) inevitable fall.

3. Wow. Such research. Much impressed: The efficacy of presenting complex ideas in meme

I imagine the presentation for this topic going a lot like this…

Presenter

Me

Presenter

 So, are any of you presenting this season? What are your topics? Share your division’s research day events in the comments below!

March 17th, 2014

“I don’t have time!” Yes, you do.

The funny thing about this post is that it’s about time management, and I am currently struggling to find time to write it. Things are piling up and falling through the cracks, and it’s not like I’m not trying to get work done – I am. We’ve all experienced it before. Everything is going well, you’re feeling great, when all of a sudden there is too much to do and too little time to do it. Since we’re already halfway through March, we’re smack dab in the middle of the busiest time of year. There are papers to write, groceries to buy, presentations to give, graduations to request, and assignments to grade. The students you’re TA-ing are as anxious about their papers as you are about yours. Things just suck right now, no question about it.

There are a million ways to deal with the kind of stress we are deal with right now. We can make ourselves take break, do some yoga, or just spend a day with your phones and tablets off. Despite knowing all that, I often hear myself saying how little time I have. My excuse to not go to the gym or take a break is that I don’t have enough time to do it. It all boils down to how you manage that time. Afterall, you can’t afford to take a break if you don’t think you have enough time to do so.

We’re all in grad school, which means that we all have at least some skill in time management. Otherwise, we wouldn’t have made it so far. So today we’re going to take it back to the basics. What do you do to help you manage your time? Below are the three things that I do (or wish I did) all the time.

1. Make Lists.

The first step to making a list is to make the list. Brainstorm all the possible things you need to do (I usually do it the night before). That’s the easy part. The hard part is prioritizing the items on that list. Go through that list and put a start or circle things that are important or is something you must do that day. Don’t try to be a superhero and make everything a priority.

2. Use a calendar.

You might be going, “Duh. Of course I should use a calendar.” Using one to schedule appointments and classes is self-explanatory, but I’m always surprised as how under-utilized calendars are. Gone are the days where we have to physically write down whatever we need to do by hand (though if you still do that, my hat goes off to you). Nowadays, it’s ridiculously easy to not only record events on them, and most let you colour-code and send you automated reminds ahead of important dates. I like to colour my assignment deadlines an angry red, just so that I don’t accidentally miss them. You tend to not forgot things that look angry. The tools are there – be smart on how you use them.

3. Learn different ways to manage your time and work.

As your work habits and schedules change, the things you to do help you handle it all might have to change too. There are plenty of good resources out there, and plenty of people have shared their systems online. You’re reading my tips, and I would love to hear about yours. If you find yourself stuck in a rut, just look around, and you can probably find something that works for you. But if that isn’t your thing, and you would like some one-on-one help with time management, the Academic Success Centre offers time management workshops for students.

So that’s it from me. What are some of your favourite time management tips? Share them in the comments below!

 

March 7th, 2014

To Network, or Not To Network

I’m currently right in the middle of my summer practicum application process. For many students, grad students included, now is generally the time where you start thinking about summer jobs and career prospects. Since most of us are on the same boat right now, I thought it would be a good idea to talk about some career-related things, and share some experiences I’ve had over the years.

A big buzzword we hear all the time is “networking”. They always tell us that networking can help us find a good job, and it’s about who you know, not what you know. Now, I don’t have a whole lot of work experience, and I also don’t really know if the merits of networking are as great as they say. Networking isn’t the magic ritual that can get you a great job. Just because you know someone doesn’t mean you are guaranteed a job, no matter how many success stories you hear. In reality, I find that networking is much more about getting to know people who can help you help yourself. It’s not who you know, but how you know them, that will help you the most in the long run.

Take myself, for example. I’m relatively young, and have very little “real world” experience to speak of. When I applied for my first real job (as communications intern at U of T), I found and got the job not because someone I know pulled some string to get me in, but because I was able to take advantage of the networks I had already. At the time, my network was largely Twitter based. Someone I was following posted a link to the job application. I just happened to click on it, and here I am, still blogging for U of T!

The funny thing about networks is that you have to grow it when you’re not looking to “use” it (i.e. looking for a job), so that when you do need it, it’s right there. The great thing about it is that it’s really easy to do. I don’t know about you, but when I hear people talking about networking and how critical it is, I get really nervous. But the truth is, your network is probably pretty big, more so if you’re a grad student. The trick is learning how to tap into that network. Trish, our past blogger has written about it before. Today I’ll share three of my tips with all of you.

1. Be a connector

Networking is a two way street. Some of the best career speakers I’ve heard talk about networking not as something someone else can do for you, but something you can do for them. Practically speaking, you have to give the person your incentive for connecting with you. What you’re doing is forming a two way relationship that is mutually beneficial. Don’t just network with them, connect.

2. Think about social media

Social media is also another buzzword you may have heard. While there are strong opinions about using social media to network, I personally find platforms like Twitter to be very useful in helping identify people I want to talk to and learn from. I built a good part of my career so far around social media, and really believe that knowing how to use it, and becoming comfortable with it, can help you know who to know. The culture around social media also helps with the how part – no need to craft a letter! Just tweet them.

Commenting on blogs (like this one!) is like networking too :D

3. Be genuine

I know that I’ve made a good connection when I think to myself, “this person has offered to help me, and they’re not just saying that.” No one likes a person who is only out for themselves, and no one likes a person they feel like they don’t know. Don’t be that person!

Do you have any networking tips? Share them in the comments below!

network

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