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How U of T can help you find a summer job

We still have a month of exams ahead of us, but summer is just around the corner and I could not be happier about it! Every day, its sunnier a bit longer and just a little bit warmer and it has a really positive impact on my mood and energy.

But for me, this summer is going to look a lot like this whole year. Just like during the year, I’ll be working part-time and taking classes. At first, I worried that I wouldn’t really get a summer break and I’d be totally burnt out by the time the fall semester started. But then I found a part-time summer job on campus; now, I’ll be doing really interesting work in my area of study, and I will be able to easily line up my courses with my work schedule so I’m able to have time in the week to relax, get outside, and enjoy the sunny weather.

It can be tough to find a summer job, but there a lot of ways that resources at U of T can help you get started.

1. Attend workshops at the Career Centre to discover careers and boost your resume. Visit the Career Learning Network to view workshops available at the CLN, like the LinkedIn Lab on April 5 to learn how to optimize your LinkedIn profile and social media to attract employers; the Resume Workshop on April 6 to get feedback on your resume and learn how to tailor it for a job posting; and the Finding Work workshop on April 7 to learn about resources, tools, and tricks for finding a job.

2. Get one-on-one advice with a career advising appointment. In particular if you’re looking for a summer opportunity related to your broader career goals, a career advising appointment with the Career Centre is a great way to learn about how you can find a job related to your career path and plan long-term. There are various kinds of appointments including resume, cover letter, and LinkedIn advising, as well as career advising. There are drop-in hours on Tuesdays from 3:30-6:00pm weekly. Learn more about career advising appointments on the Career Centre website.

A student at a career centre appointment.

A career advising appointment can be really helpful. Image via the Career Centre website.

3. Plan ahead for an internship abroad next summer. If you’re thinking ahead to next summer, think about getting experience abroad. An internship is a great way to both advance your career and explore the world, and the Centre for International Opportunites can connect you to internship opportunities abroad. As well, the GoinGlobal portal on the CLN directs you to an employer directory for work abroad (Log In to the CLN here, then go to Resources on the left navigation menu, and then click “GoinGlobal.”) Learn more about international work experience on the Career Centre website.

4. Get a permit to work in Canada as an international student. If you’re an international student, you may need a work permit to work in Canada over the summer, or a post-graduation work permit to work in Canada following your graduation. Learn more at the Centre for International Experience’s upcoming information sessions (multiple dates offered) on the CIE’s event listings.

5. Tap into your networks. Ask your professors, department, college, and friends if they know of any opportunities or have any advice. This is how I got my summer job, and how I’ve found out about other jobs I’ve had at U of T over the years. You can go to your professor’s office hours or drop in to your registrar or department office and let them know that you are looking for summer work in your area of study (or in a certain role). They may be able to let you know about work-study positions they are planning to post, or about related internships or jobs they know of. Some departments have their own career officers you can talk to. It’s always worthwhile to ask, put yourself on their radar, and get a feel for what’s out there.

Learn more about finding summer jobs and career planning on the Career Centre website.

danielle

Danielle is the summer 2015 Communications Intern at the Office of Student Life. She wrapped up her undergrad this year and will be entering a master's program at U of T in the fall, studying in the Faculty of Information. She previously studied English and Jewish Studies with a minor in History. Danielle studied abroad twice, in Jerusalem and Berlin, did a service learning course, and did a few work-study positions. Her favourite part of her undergrad was working at The Varsity, the campus newspaper. She was the editor-in-chief in her final year. She's passionate about good writing, student journalism, reading, knitting, long walks (on the beach or otherwise), and table tennis, which she insists she is very good at, though her friends may not agree. You can reach her on twitter @lifeatuoft over the summer if you want to chat!

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